Cases of miscarriages, stillbirths after COVID-19 vaccination

It cannot be confirmed whether these cases are a direct result of COVID-19 vaccines or other circumstances.
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Thirty-four cases of pregnant women experiencing miscarriages or stillbirths after getting a COVID-19 vaccine were submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).

VAERS, a system run by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), allows people to submit a report of adverse events occurring after vaccination. 

The CDC said that “adverse events from vaccines are common but underreported, with less than one per cent reported to the Food and Drug Administration.” Low reporting rates directly correlate with a delay in identifying the “problem” of vaccines, potentially endangering the health of the public, the report found.

The information submitted to VAERS does not mean that the events that occurred were a direct side effect of the vaccine. In fact, the VAERS system labels miscarriages as ‘spontaneous miscarriages or abortions’.

In a report by VeryWell Health, an online resource for health issues and concerns stated, “research suggests that between 10-20 per cent of women with a medically confirmed pregnancy will end in miscarriage. Eighty per cent of those will occur during the first trimester.”

While the information submitted to VAERS cannot be confirmed as a direct result of getting a COVID-19 shot, there has been worldwide controversy over whether pregnant women should get the vaccine or not.

According to research by the CDC, it has been determined that “pregnant people are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19”. This means an increased chance of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, and even death compared to non-pregnant women.

The CDC also stated that there is currently limited data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for pregnant women. However, researchers have studies planned to develop a vaccine for pregnant women.

Pfizer and BioNTech announced the launch of a COVID-19 vaccine trial for pregnant women in which it plans to inject approximately 4000 women with their experimental vaccine.

All COVID-19 vaccines are still undergoing experimental trials and have been approved in some countries but only for emergency use.

While millions across the world have already received a COVID-19 vaccine, researchers are still trying to understand how the vaccine impacts pregnant women.

It is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that pregnant women speak to a health care provider about the vaccine and its relative risks before taking it.

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