UN: ‘Bloodiest day’ of protests in Myanmar kills 38 people

Since the military seized power over Myanmar on February 1, at least 50 people have been killed during protests
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The UN reported at least 38 deaths on March 3, in what is being called the ‘bloodiest day’ of protests in Myanmar since the military seized power on February 1.

“We have now more than over 50 people dead since the coup started,” said the U.N. special envoy for Myanmar, Christine Schraner Burgener.

Soldiers and police fired shots on peaceful protestors on the streets of Myanmar just one day after neighbouring countries urged for restraint and offered to help resolve the crisis.

Burgener spoke about video footage she examined of the protests, calling them “very disturbing video clips,” and adding that “one was (showing) police beating a volunteer medical crew, who were not armed.”

She said the videos depicted police using 9mm sub-machine guns, firing live ammunition at people.

“Another video clip showed a protester was taken away from police and they shot him from very near, maybe one meter. He didn’t resist his arrest and it seems he died on the street,” she cited in the virtual briefing.

Just two weeks ago, massive crowds gathered in the capital of Myanmar, Nay Pyi Taw, to attend the funeral of a young woman who was among the first few people killed during one of the protests.

The woman, Mya Thwe Thwe Khaing, was reportedly shot in the head just before her 20th birthday. She was peacefully protesting.

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