[WATCH] Amazon installs surveillance cameras inside delivery vehicles for “drivers safety”

Drivers have raised concerns that this may infringe their privacy, and call it a “punishment system”
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Amazon has partnered with Netradyne to install surveillance cameras inside delivery vehicles to record “driver behaviours” for safety purposes. The announcement has sparked backlash and criticism from privacy advocates.  

According to a demonstration video released by Amazon, the “Driveri” quad camera is installed in the vehicle to keep drivers and communities in which they deliver safe. 

Driveri is a surveillance system designed by Netradyne, a transportation technology company based in southern California. They are the first company to use artificial intelligence and video to create industry-leading safety systems. 

“Our intention with this technology is to set drivers up for success and provide them support in being safer on the road and handling incidents if and when they happen,” said Karolina Haraldsdottir, Senior Manager at Last Mile Safety. 

According to CNBC, Amazon’s Digital Signal Processing program – essentially an operator to contact drivers – has faced criticism for safety protocols in the past. Previous investigations done by NBC News, BuzzFeed News and ProPublica, described poor working conditions at some DSPs according to a few interviews with drivers and former Amazon employees. 

Photo: Courtesy of group for Amazon drivers post

“Big Brother in the sky wants to watch us now,” reddit user posted on the reddit group for Amazon drivers

CNBC also reported that some of the DSP drivers said they are concerned about potential privacy tradeoffs. The drivers, who asked to remain anonymous, described the cameras as “unnerving” and a punishment system. 

According to a privacy policy issued by Amazon, footage collected by the cameras can be used for employment decisions. 

In the Vimeo description video, when the camera detects that an employee is engaging in unsafe behaviour, it triggers the camera to upload footage to a secure portal that’s accessible by Amazon and the DSP. 

A Kentucky driver told CNBC that if a driver is caught yawning, the camera will instruct them to pull over for at least 15 minutes. If the driver does not comply, they may get a call from their DSP asking them to pull over.

Wiki Production Code: A0584

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